11 Statistics About Police Misconduct

  • May 11, 2016
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In the United States the subject of police misconduct has become a major source of debate in the past few years. To better educate we've collected 11 facts pertaining to U.S. police misconduct.

1.

Number of Citizens Killed

Over 1,000 people (a list can be found here) were killed by police officers in 2015. This number includes armed and unarmed suspects.

2.

Black Citizens

Black citizens are three-times more likely to be killed by a police officer. What's more, a third of black victims had no weapons on their person, and in 2014 seventy-one percent of black victims weren't even suspected of being armed or having committed a violent crime.

3.

Gun Violence Totals

According to the Gun Violence Archive there have been 51,800 verifiable gun incidents in 2015. Of that number (which includes suicides as well as homicides, accidental or otherwise), 4,310 involved police officers. Less than one-percent of police are actually indicted for killing citizens; they are more commonly charged with weapons-related offenses or assault.

4.

Sexual Assault

Data from the Nation Police Misconduct Reporting Project shows that in 2010 sexual assault was the second-most reported form of police misconduct (the first was excessive force). However, this data isn't considered accurate given how infrequently sexual assault in general is reported.

5.

Police Fatalities

Meanwhile, deaths of on duty police officers are on the rise: 124 fatalities total in 2015 (up eight-percent according to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund). Deaths by firearms are actually down compared to 2014 while death by other means have actually increased.

6.

Effectiveness of Tasers

Tasers are often seen as being an effective non-lethal use of force by police. Between 2001 and 2014 there were 634 taser-related deaths at the hands of police (source: Electronic Village). This number is low comparatively but doesn't account for Taser-related injuries.

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