10 of the Absolutely Most Foolish Kicksters Ever

  • April 20, 2016
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6.

I want to publish my book JFK Closure

This author believes their biological father was John F. Kennedy—they even appeared in some tabloids years ago. Their claim seems to be based largely on three things: when they were born (1964), where they were raised (Washington, D.C.), and something their adoptive parents said. It wasn't going to go anywhere since, you know, there's seemingly no proof, but the saddest part was how little he was asking for: $500 to publish his ebook, and not a dollar raised.

7.

Freedom Lost

Books on Kickstarter are a pretty common sight. Here the author proposes a novel based on a world where martial law is declared under FEMA. Strangely enough, these sort of political thriller/conspiracy theory novels do very well on Amazon's CreateSpace market. So why take it to Kickstarter at all looking for $4,000?

8.

Europa Park – die Toiletten

A good idea: promoting something you love. Not always a good idea: promoting something you love in a quirky way but seeking other people to pay for it. This photographer wanted to promote an amusement park with a portfolio focused entirely on its apparently amazing toilets.

9.

MTG for Everyone!

A fan of Magic: the Gathering, concerned that the most successful trading card game ever made was somehow in danger, hoped that internet strangers would pay for him to buy cards to show other people how to play his beloved game. He probably could have done this with his own collection (which he alludes to), which may be why Kickstarter suspended this brilliant and not-at-all foolish idea.

10.

Jesus Melts for You

This is proof that fame won't always mean success. Cosimo Cavallaro made a controversial nude life-sized Jesus out of chocolate. Outrage was such that an exhibition featuring the piece was canned in 2007. In 2013 he took to Kickstarter to fund a performance piece wherein he would melt the Christ and make a documentary about it. He managed $110 of the $98,000 goal.

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